Indian street food : Nazim’s Kathi Kebab.

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We met up with a friend, Ajay in Delhi and he introduced us to Nazims, Indian kebabs.

It seems like a bit of an institution in Delhi, full of people and history. The meals are mostly wrapped rolls, mutton, lamb and eggs feature in the wraps. We had a double chicken egg roll and a mutton seekh kebab egg roll both served up with chilli sauce and griddled onions.

We washed it all down with the rose sherbert soda – a sort of coca-cola meets Turkish delight.

 

Excellent restaurant, will definitely be visiting next time were in Delhi and a clean, popular location for a filling meal.

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Indian street food : Jalebi (sugar syrup pretzels)

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Jalebi are a common sight across Rajasthan, and other parts of India with vats of oil on street corners and vendors fishing golden orange rings from the hot oil. Variations also exist in middle eastern countries.

A sweet note, Jalebis are a flour and liquid mixture which is piped into hot oil and deep fried  until a golden yellow colour. After frying they are dipped in a sugar syrup mixture which can be flavoured with spices such as cardamon and  saffron , which presumably helps to give them the bright orange colour. Sometimes rose water can be added too.

Sourced from Flickr via a creative commons license, thanks to Nate Gray. No modifications made to the image.

When they are poured into the oil, the vendor swirls the batter to make a distinctive swirling circular pattern, similar to a pretzel.  They are very sweet,  we bought  a whole paper bag for only ten rupees! Far too many sweets for my not very sweet tooth.Can be served hot, or cold.

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Indian street food : Kachori (deep fried vegetable fritter)

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A wander around the market in Jodhpur found me Kachori, a common breakfast in Rajasthan and a relative to the samosa.

Variations exist all over India including size, shape and ingredients.
Verdict? Really good. The batter was really light and crispy, with a  suprisingly spicy filling of onion, and vegetable. Will definitely be hunting for more of these!

Indian street food : Pani Puri (crispy puffs & tamarind water)

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Pani Puri are, it seems an incredibly popular Delhi street food. there seems to be a seller on almost every street corner, and since arriving we have been curiously spying them from a distance – the moon like shells of puri piled high in containers on makeshift stalls. at first glance, I expected it to be sweet based on the little shells.

The seller picks a shell and punctures the top, filling it with cooked potato and pouring over a green tamarind sauce. The taste and texture sensation was pretty alien to me, kind of soggy crunch with potato inside and sharp tamarind flavour? I wasn’t really very keen, but I kept going until a lovely Indian man asked to take a picture with me so I could excuse myself from eating.  When you buy a serving the vendor makes them for you one by one, I guess it’s a little game between buyer and seller as to how many you can get – Wikipedia specifies between four and eight is the norm, three was enough for me.

After a bit more research I found that pani puri sauce is made from tamarind and water – potentially not very sanitary – which could lead to illness in a country so infamous for traveller sickness.

 

street food : bread pakoda (deep fried sandwich)

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When we arrived in India, bread pakoda was the first bona-fide street food we ate, a first bite into the chasm of Indian snacks and hand held foods.

We christened the pakoda as ‘deep fried sandwich’ until we found out some more information. It’s a street food staple in the northern part of India and something we saw for sale quite often around Rajasthan.

bread pakoda AKA deep fried sandwich

bread pakoda AKA deep fried sandwich

 

The concept is simple, plain white bread is stuffed with a filling of mushed up potatoes or potato curry, sometimes with peas, the sandwich is sealed with batter and deep fried. The one pictured includes paneer, a type of Indian cheese.

It’s hot, crispy and deliciously naughty. And for a fee of sixteen rupees, what’s not to like?

 

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