Sydney : Rose Seidler House

Standard

The name Harry Seidler brings up a bit of controversy in Sydney. He was born in Austria in the 1920s and moved to England, Canada, the USA and finally Australia where he spent the majority of his life. He has made a pretty massive contribution to the face of Sydney and designed some impressive and innovative buildings, including my favourite; the Rose Seidler House in Wahroonga 23km outside of the Sydney CBD.

Harry Seidler designed the Rose Seidler House for his mother. When she died it was turned into a living musuem, as part of the Historic Houses Trust of New South Wales along with some pretty impressive and historically important buildings such as Vacluse House and Elizabeth Farm.

Rose seidler house sign

The building is amazing, it’s practically untouched since her death in 1991 and full of original furniture. The kitchen still has original appliances the building itself is still visually striking and original, sixty years on.

As the Historic Houses Trust website states “Bored with the monotony of suburbia? So was Harry Seidler when he arrived from America in 1948.”

*

If you liked this, please share it with your Facebook friends, via Twitter or on Stumbleupon. You can also ‘follow us’ using box at the top of the page or join us on Facebook. Thanks.

Sydney : The Queen Victoria Building.

Standard

The QVB is probably one of my most favourite places in Sydney. Not because it’s full of expensive shops, and not because it links directly into yet more shops via the basement.

I love it because it’s an beautifully restored old building. Not old on an English scale, obviously…  It’s classy and blends the old with the new seamlessly. Plus, it has some really posh public toilets.

It was originally completed in 1898, and performed many functions. Standing on the site of the original market, it was built to house a concert hall. It became the city library, offices, and other tenants including piano tuners.

I’m pretty much in awe of any beautiful architecture, I can quite happily spend time sitting and staring at all the intricacies and detailing. Stay classy QVB…

*

Interested in Sydney? Check out some more culture, tips and articles here.

If you liked this, please share it with your Facebook friends, or via Twitter. You can also ‘follow us’ using box at the top of the page or join us on Facebook.

Sydney : Ballast Point Park, Balmain.

Standard

Three of my favourite interests, from a purely aesthetic point of view are architecture, design and photography.

Ballast Point Park in the Sydney suburb of Balmain, manages to straddle all three. Over the last 150 years, the site has been used for many things, including a private estate, a fuel depot, a grease plant and finally returned to the public to be used as a park.

It’s industrial history has not been forgotten and many elements have been retained and recycled as part of the artistic site, such as ‘Tank 101’,  much of the metal was salvaged to create the installations. The dotted typeface used on  the site reflected the thousands of rivets used in it’s industrial period. The  passages of poetry on the installation read ‘Stone statues of ancient waves’ &  ‘Tongue like dingoes on shore’ are from ‘The Death Of Isaac Nathan’ by Australian poet Les Murray.

The clean, cold lines of poured concrete reinforce its industrial past.

The park is an award winning space, and has great views of the CBD and the famous Sydney Harbour Bridge, it is strangely calm and serene for somewhere so close to the city centre.

Curiously, there is also a Michael Jackson shrine. similar in theme to the love locks made famous by the Pont de l’Archeveche in Paris; but seemingly now popping up everywhere including the Harbour Bridge (although a security guy told us they just cut them off once a month!) Paris, and romance are like mac and cheese, or Kylie and Jason.  MJ & Balmain are, well not the same.

You can reach Ballast Point Park on the Cockatoo Island ferry from Circular Quay.